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George Weigel

GeorgeWeigel

  • Remembering ‘The Few’

    Seventy-five years ago, on Sunday, Sept. 15, 1940, Winston Churchill and his wife Clementine were driven from the prime minister’s country house, Chequers, to the nearby village of Uxbridge: A Royal Air Force station and the headquarters from which Air Vice-Marshal Keith Park was directing the RAF’s No. 11 Group against the onslaught of the German Luftwaffe in southern England.
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  • Flannery O’Connor and Catholic realism

    From this vale of tears, one can never be sure about the boundaries of acceptable behavior at the Throne of Grace. Is laughter at earthly foibles permitted?
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  • Progressive Catholic authoritarianism: An enduring problem

    Back in the day (the late 1960s or thereabouts), Father Andrew Greeley – the model of an old-fashioned liberal Catholic – accused Father Daniel Berrigan (the beau ideal of postconciliar Catholic radicalism) of harboring an authoritarian streak in his politics.
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  • The church and the ‘new normal’

    In the wake of the Supreme Court’s marriage decision, these sober thoughts occur:
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  • The Catholic Church’s German crisis

    The 21st-century church owes a lot to 20th-century German Catholicism: for its generosity to Catholics in the Third World; for the witness of martyrs like Alfred Delp, Bernhard Lichtenberg, and Edith Stein; for its contributions to Biblical studies, systematic and moral theology, liturgical renewal, and Catholic social doctrine, through which German Catholicism played a leading role in Vatican II’s efforts to renew Catholic witness for the third millennium.
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  • The difference Cardinal George made

    On September 2, 1939 the House of Commons debated the British government’s response to the German invasion of Poland the previous day.
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  • Remembering Number 84

    He scored 40 times in an eight-year NFL career, best known, now, for the touchdown he didn’t score, as the sun set over Yankee Stadium on Dec. 28, 1958.
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  • ‘Wolf Hall’ and upmarket anti-Catholicism

    “Wolf Hall,” the BBC adaptation of Hillary Mantel’s novel about early Tudor England, began airing on PBS’s “Masterpiece Theater” Easter Sunday night.
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  • Easter and evangelism

    Galatians 1:15-18 is not your basic witness-to-the-Resurrection text. Yet St. Paul’s mini-spiritual autobiography helps us understand just how radically the experience of the Risen Lord changed the first disciples’ religious worldview, and why an evangelical imperative was built into that experience.
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  • Keeping Catholic schools Catholic

    There seems to be some dispute as to whether the original Trotskyite – that would be, um, Leon Trotsky – ever said, “You may not be interested in the dialectic but the dialectic is interested in you.”
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  • World Christianity by the numbers

    The annual “Status of Global Christianity” survey published by the International Bulletin of Missionary Research is a cornucopia of numbers: Some are encouraging; others are discouraging; many of them are important for grasping the nature of this particular moment in Christian history.
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  • Ukraine: Disinformation and confusion

    Two recent interviews in the National Catholic Register suggest that there’s considerable confusion about what’s what in Ukraine.
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  • Lent, day by day

    The phrase “Lenten journey” has become ubiquitous in contemporary Catholicism, but for once, AmChurchSpeak makes an important point: Lent is a journey – a journey to Calvary with the Lord and an opportunity to reflect on how well we’ve each picked up the cross daily (as instructed in Luke 9: 23) and followed him.
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  • Evangelical challenges for Vatican diplomacy

    The bilateral diplomacy of the Holy See is unique in world affairs, in that it has little or nothing to do with the things with which diplomats typically occupy their time: trade issues, security matters, visas.
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  • Nonsense on ‘60 Minutes’

    “60 Minutes,” the CBS News “magazine” that helped redefine television journalism, prides itself on challenging conventional wisdom, discomfiting the comfortable, kicking shibboleths in the shins, and opening new arguments.
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  • Europe and nothingness

    In the wake of the horrific jihadist attack on the Paris-based journal Charlie Hebdo, the trope “satirical magazine” was regularly deployed to explain Charlie’s character and content.
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  • Owning our baptism

    The transfer of the celebration of the Epiphany to a Sunday from Jan. 6 (the solemnity’s traditional date), and the elimination of Sundays-after-Epiphany in favor of the ill-named Sundays of “Ordinary Time,” has made a hash of the Christmas liturgical season, as I suggested in “Evangelical Catholicism.”
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  • The last Puritan statesman and the 2016 conventions

    Had I the resources, the one new book I’d give every delegate to the national political conventions meeting later this month is James Traub’s masterful biography, “John Quincy Adams: Militant Spirit” (Basic Books).
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  • Two Catholics and the Catholic game

    Baseball is by far the most Catholic of the sports on which we lavish such attention and passion.
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